Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Weather and maybe

My brother told me to stop telling people about his weather. I'd like to point out that I've been very careful to not state his location, so that people won't flock there, or stalk him, or whatever. And you know, now I have to tell everyone your weather. They've come to expect it. High of 66 today; 38 tomorrow. Fickle.
. . . . . . . . . . .
What do you mean when you say maybe? When I say maybe I mean just that: maybe. It could go either way. Maybe yes, or maybe no. Can't really make a commitment at this point. I've learned, after 13+ years of marriage, that when my husband says maybe, he really means yes. As is, maybe I will have another slice of pie. Scott doesn't really have a substitute for maybe in his vocabulary, either. Very black and white, that husband of mine. I must admit, I take a certain stubborn glee in continuing to interpret his maybes as maybes. In the previous case (the piece of pie), I won't bring him another piece of pie until he revises his maybe to a verbal yes.

I have always (as much as I can remember), been a face value kind of girl, perhaps even a little gullible. When people speak to me, I expect them to say what they mean, and I believe that they mean what they say. Not very female of me, is it? I was blindsided this week, though. Someone other than my husband told me maybe, and I believed her. I thought, OK, we could go either way on this one. I choose no. Later on I found out that her maybe was really a yes. Thankfully I still have time to remedy the situation.

One of our pastors is fond of saying something like, "so let's let our yes be yes," usually in reference to taking the offering (if that doesn't make sense to you, don't worry--it's OK). I think there must be something like that in the Bible somewhere, given the frequency with which she says it. I feel like we should let our maybe be maybe.

4 comments:

  1. When I try to follow your "Robb (brother in law)" link at the bottom I discover a "Blog not found" page. I know it used to come up, but apparently the socialist Obama regime doesn't like Rob's blog site and has shut it down. It could be because Rob uses that extra b at the end of his name, so I am going to refer to him as Rob and not Robb from now on. It is a slippery slope we are treading on.

    Maybe you should remove that link. Maybe we should organize a protest and get Rob's first amendment rights back. Maybe I shouldn't let my imagination run away with me, but I think maybe we should mount a rescue mission and move Rob to Canada where he can become a Zamboni driver for the Quebec Nordiques. Of course, maybe that job does not pay very much given that maybe the Nordiques don't live in Canada anymore.

    One thing people say that I suspect they don't really mean is the phrase "Needless to say".

    I think I am going to start coming here for my weather reports. I think maybe I'll let the Nordiques know they can check their weather here as well.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I should have said "It is a slippery slope on which we are treading."

    or

    We are treading on a slippery slope.

    I apologize. I do not want to offend Scott's sense of proper grammar.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Sorry. It wasn't Obama--Robb changed his site to dawson64, which makes so much more sense than robbdawson, and I haven't had a chance to change the link yet. I don't know why he didn't choose dawson64 to begin with.

    And I prefer: it is a slippery slope upon which we tread.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Much better. I was worried.

    "Upon which we tread" is much better.

    ReplyDelete

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